Quotes About Band Life

  • Brad Paisley on Mick Jagger

    When they were in Nashville, they came in a couple of days early. What they do, which is really neat, when you tour at the level they're at, they sort of take over a city. When The Rolling Stones are coming—and you remember when they were here—Nashville was buzzing for several days. It was like, "There's a Mick Jagger sighting!" We ended up going to dinner at Etch here in town. And what was funny about that was that Mick had said—I had said, well when you get in town you wanna go eat? We've got some great new restaurants, and he said, "Yeah." He picked the restaurant, and I thought for sure he's got people that do that. When we sat down to eat I said, "I've never been here before, how'd you find this?" He said, "Oh yeah I think Trip Advisor or something like that." [Laughs] He, like looked it up, and it said this is great. He said, "It said this is great, I thought we should try it." The next thing you know we're sitting there and I said, "You've gotta come back when we can be here without anybody knowing, and see if we can record and you can experience the city and really see what the creative process is like in this town," and I never expected him to say. "Yeah let's do it," and he did. Next thing you know three months later he was at my house.

    YouTube

  • Brad Paisley on Keith Richards

    Somebody gave me a tip, which was really interesting, "Mention the Louvin Brothers to Keith Richards." That's all I had to do, and he was ready to talk about "Satan Is Real." He loves that album...The Louvin Brothers were a Bluegrass duo that were amazing. They sang great. They were Opry members, Charlie and Ira Louvin. Ira was a hellian. He was crazy. He was one of those guys, the stories are legendary. But they also did Gospel records that were sort of really judgmental Gospel records [laugh], and it was a really interesting thing. [The Stones] were fascinated by stuff like that.

    YouTube

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  • Glyn Johns on Ian Stewart

    By this time the Stones had a successful record deal and were being managed by Andrew Oldham, who had taken the decision to fire Stu from the band as he felt Stu did not look right. I thought that was pretty extraordinary as none of them were exactly textbook for a rock star. He was offered the job as their road manager, I am sure out of loyalty from some members of the band and also due to the fact that he owned the van that they all traveled in with the gear. I was in the next room at Decca Studios when he was told, and when I expressed my disgust at their decision he told me that he was quite happy with the arrangement, adding that the idea of being a pop star had no appeal to him whatsoever and, as he felt they would become incredibly successful, it would be a great way to see the world. As time went by, it proved to be an excellent decision, as he really took to his new role and the freedom it gave him. He was far too straight to ever be a rock star. The Stones were the true beneficiaries. They not only got the services of a great piano player, they also had the most trustworthy friend anyone could wish for as a road manager. Keith Richards has always said that he is still working for Stu and, as far as he is concerned, The Rolling Stones are Stu's band.

    Sound Man

  • Glyn Johns on Ian Stewart

    We moved in together and the one piece of furniture that Stu brought with him was his upright piano. I remember waking up one morning to the sound of the most extraordinary blues music wafting up from the living room along with the usual smell of deliberately burned toast that he would make every morning. I went to investigate, to find Stu sitting at the piano, wearing nothing but his underpants, with an open letter on the stool beside him. The contents of the letter, apparently from an old flame, had upset him to such an extent that the only way he could deal with it was to play the blues. I felt like I was intruding, so I went back to my room where, for the next hour or so, I was treated to this impromptu outpouring of emotion by one of the finest blues musicians I have ever come across.

    Sound Man

    This quote appears in the "Stu '62" chapter of the Glyn Johns autobiography, Sound Man. Glyn and Stu became fast friends and eventually roommates. Glyn describes there house like this: "Stu kept all of the Stones' gear at the house, so we would appropriate guitar amps various from the loft in the roof to use for our sound system, which was very rarely silent, and incredibly loud. Fortunately, the house was in the middle of a large plot a long way back from the road and the neighbors on either side were some distance away. There were many great parties at 'The Bungalow,' with much coming and going. There was always something going on, but because we were all so busy we never seemed to get under each other's feet."

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